Archie Baird

Archie featured at inside-right for Aberdeen FC when they beat Hibs 2-1 in the final at Hampden in 1947. But before claiming Scottish Cup glory, hero Archie had to survive prisoner of war camps.Rutherglen-born Archie later wrote the acclaimed book Family of Four, detailing his experiences during World War 2. Archie made 144 appearances for Aberdeen FC, scoring 37 goals.Former Aberdeen FC keeper Fred Martin, who was a team-mate of Archie’s in the 1950s, paid tribute to the Pittodrie great.

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Posted by anonymous
Tuesday 04th of October 2011 22:50:25
When war broke out in 1939 it put paid to his dreams of being a professional footballer with Aberdeen. He was conscripted into the army medical corps and sent to France. He was then moved to the Western desert and in 1942 was captured by the Germans near Tobruk and handed over to the Italians.
Posted by anonymous
Tuesday 27th of September 2011 20:31:37
His book a Family of Four is a Fascinating account of Archie's life. Most notably his escape from a POW camp and refuge from German troops and Italian fascists. The bravery of the Italian peasants who helped him and his comrades while putting themselves and their families in danger is a heart-warming story, a welcome reminder of the good side of human nature. Archie Baird was also a great footballer, was in the Aberdeen side that first lifted the Scottish Cup in 1947. They don't make them like that anymore, Archie I salute you! Stand Free. Forza Aberdeen!
Posted by Peter
Sunday 25th of September 2011 19:20:31
In November 2009 Aberdeen played St Johnstone in the SPL, and a joint silence was held to mark Armistice as well as Archie Baird's career with the two clubs.
Posted by Rab
Sunday 25th of September 2011 19:14:13
Born on 8 May, 1919, in Rutherglen, he signed for Aberdeen before the war but was called up before making his debut.He fought in Italy but was captured. However, he later escaped and saw out the war living with an Italian family who pretended he was their son.He finally began his Aberdeen career in 1946, notching up more than 100 appearances and scoring 26 goals from the wing. During his time at Pittodrie he helped the club win the Southern League Cup (a forerunner of the Scottish League Cup) in 1946 and the Scottish Cup in 1947.His form also earned him a call-up to the Scotland squad for a friendly with Belgium in 1946.In 1953 he moved to St. Johnstone where he played for three seasons before retiring.After retiring from football, Baird worked as a teacher and a sports journalist.He documented his unusual wartime experiences in a 1989 book called Family of Four.
Posted by anonymous
Sunday 25th of September 2011 08:54:25
After leaving the game, Baird – who until his death was believed to be Aberdeen's oldest surviving player – embarked on a fulfilling and packed life as a sports writer for the Scottish Sunday Express and a PE teacher who rose to become assistant head of Hilton Academy in Aberdeen by the time he retired in 1979. Somehow he even chiselled out the necessary time from his crowded schedule to qualify as a glider pilot. Baird believed passionately in education, achieving degrees in English and Italian through the University of London by correspondence course in the 1960s then teaching his second language at evening class. A warm, gregarious and charming man who had come to love all things Italian, he moved to Italy for a year from 1980, along with his wife Nancy, to teach English there. His attachment to journalism was equally deep – many of his family members were practitioners, including his brother-in-law Magnus Magnusson and Magnusson's daughter Sally – and he became a popular co
Posted by Jock
Sunday 25th of September 2011 08:52:44
Archie Baird was also an author penning a moving autobiography, Family Of Four (1989). It was a book in which his love of football was abundantly evident.

Archie Baird

Archie Baird

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